Ch. 4 – The Presence of the Past I

A List of Supplemental Links to Chapter 4

4.1. SLAVERY, THE BLACK CANADIAN NINETEENTH CENTURY, AND CARIBBEAN CONTEXTS IN CONTEMPORARY BLACK CANADIAN WRITING 155

Questioning Black Canadian History: Lorris Elliott’s “Angélique” Fragment 157

Black Canadian History and Lawrence Hill’s Any Known Blood and The Book of Negroes 160
Any Known Blood: Revising and Re-appropriating the Canadian Slave Narrative 160

 

4.2. CANADIAN SLAVERY AND BLACK CANADIAN WRITING: LORENA GALE AND GEORGE ELLIOTT CLARKE 185

Imagining Angélique 186

Transforming the Sentence of History: Lorena Gale’s Angélique 189

After Angélique, beyond Black Angels: George Elliott Clarke’s Beatrice Chancy 194

 

4.3 ANGLOPHONE CARIBBEAN CANADIAN WRITERS AND THE LEGACIES OF THE PAST 205

Caribbeanness and Caribbean Canadian Time-Spaces 207

Caribbean Canadian Farm and Domestic Workers: “Like Nothing Ever Change” 213

Witnessing Empire: Austin Clarke’s The Polished Hoe 221

A “story that cannot but must be told”: Marlene NourbeSe Philip’s Zong! 232

Dionne Brand: Witnessing and the Inventory 239

Second-Generation Diasporas and the City: Brand, Chariandy, Alexis 257

 

4.4. WRITING THE HAITIAN DIASPORA IN QUEBEC 275

Oral Knowledge and Intergenerational Transmission in Marie-Célie Agnant’s La Dot de Sara and Le Livre d’Emma 275

The Trauma of Duvalier Repression and Impossible Returns: Agnant, Etienne, Ollivier, Laferrière 280